Origin by Dan Brown

originThis is the fifth installment of the Robert Langdon series. What’s great about these books is that they are stand alone novels that feature the same protagonist. You don’t need to read the previous books to know what’s happening in the current one. Although there are little nods to the previous books that you’d only pick up if you read them. For example, someone might make a remark about “that incident at the Vatican” or something to that effect which of course is a reference to Angels & Demons. Knowing what happened at the Vatican isn’t integral to understanding the plot of Origin.

The movie The Da Vinci Code is what prompted me to read the books and I have loved the Robert Langdon books since then. I started with The Da Vinci Code, then read Angels & Demons. After that I read the books as they were released. Angels & Demons was by far my favourite. So disappointed that the corresponding movie was so utterly terrible.

This book follows the same recipe as the other Robert Langdon books. Robert somehow finds himself in a situation with a pretty female companion and they must #savetheday. Origin starts with Robert’s friend Edmond Kirsch visiting three religious leaders and revealing to them he has discovered the origin of the the human species and discovered our destiny — through science, not religion! Obviously, the religious leaders are not happy because his discovery undermines faith and if this information became public, organized religion as we know it would crumble.

Fast forward a few days, Edmond is about to reveal his discovery to the whole world via live streaming and he has invited his dear friend and former professor, Robert Langdon, to the live presentation at the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain. As he is taking the audio guided tour of the museum Robert discovers that the person on his audio headset is not a person at all and if in fact a highly advanced artificial intelligence named Winston created by Edmond.

During the presentation of Edmond’s discovery Edmond himself is brutally assassinated on live television before he can reveal what he has discovered. So, Robert and Edmond’s friend Ambra must go on an epic adventure, aided by Winston, to discover the password to Edmond’s super top secret computer server so they can release his discovery to the world. And they must do this while evading the police and Edmond’s assassin.

Things I liked about Origin:

  • The book grabs hold of you right away and hooks you into reading more. It’s exciting and Brown’s writing style makes you really want to know the answers to the questions “Where do we come from?” and “Where are we going?”
  • Winston was an interesting character. Being an artificial intelligence (or rather, a synthetic intelligence as Winston prefers) makes him the ultimate “man in the chair” as it were. He can hack into any system and acts as a deus ex machina for Robert and Ambra. Winston has his own personality, thoughts, ideas, and feelings, even though he insists they are just programmed reactions you really have to wonder. Especially at the end of the book.

Things I didn’t like about Origin:

  • It really does follow the same recipe as the other books and while there were a few big reveals that actually surprised me at the end of the book, it was a pretty predictable plot.
  • I was also a little disappointed with the reveal of Edmond’s discovery. Especially the answer to “where are we going?” Seemed like a cop-out to me. As if Dan Brown didn’t want to make any real predictions about the future of the human race and just picked something that would be the least controversial. Although, I guess when you think about it, humans are well on their way to the outcome he describes in the book.

Overall, I really enjoyed this book and look forward to Robert Langdon’s next crazy adventure. Hopefully the movie adaptation isn’t terrible. I gave this book 5 out of 5 stars on Goodreads because, while there were a few things I was disappointed about the book was extremely entertaining and well written.

P.S. There is a secret message hidden in the plot description on the book jacket flap. Comment if you figured out what it says!

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The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

konmariHello, Internetland! I’m going to be reviewing a non-fiction book today! I actually finished reading this book about a week ago, but my schedule has been crazy lately and have only just had the time to write the review now. The book I’m reviewing is called The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo. I first heard of the “KonMari” method of tidying from a YouTube vlogger I follow called Lovely Lor (if you’re interested in Japanese Lolita Fashion Lovely Lor’s video’s are awesome to watch! Link here). I was intrigued by Lor’s video and did a bit of research on my own about the KonMari method and that’s how I found the book that started it all.

After only a couple of chapters into the book I felt really motivated to get started. I decided to finish reading the book before diving in, however. The thing about the KonMari method and Marie Kondo’s writing style is she makes cleaning and tidying seem like it’s not a chore, but something fun and relaxing. I very rarely read non-fiction books from cover-to-cover. Usually I just scan the chapters looking for pertinent information, however this book is one that I read every single word. This book is incredibly interesting to read. I can’t explain it. It’s just captivating. Marie Kondo’s words are inspirational, and almost poetic. She evokes a sense of calm, and really makes you think about what happiness means.

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up  isn’t just some other ‘how to organize’ book or a ‘how to clean’ book. It’s an in depth look at the KonMari method, which is the art of learning to let go of things that do not spark joy in your life. Marie Kondo is an organization consultant in Japan and her clients have never fallen off the horse, as it were, after taking her course. Kondo talks about her life and how she came up with the her method and she talks about her clients as well. I like that she goes through other methods and tells the reader why those methods don’t work. For example, she talks about her early obsessions with the art of storage and how it isn’t actually de-cluttering, it’s hiding the items you need to get rid of.

I feel like I need to buy a copy of this book for everyone in my life. I know so many people who could benefit from reading this book and really taking the time to sort and tidy their homes, myself included. I borrowed a copy from the library, but I want to eventually get myself a copy to keep because I feel like it will be an excellent reference book in the future.

spark joyI’m itching to try the KonMari method for myself, but as she recommends in the book you need to have the time to fully and thoroughly go through your belongings. I have been crazy busy with work, extra curricular, and side projects lately, so I haven’t had the chance to try the method out. While I wait for the time I am going to read Kondo’s second book Spark Joy: An Illustrated Master Class on the Art of Organizing and Tidying Up. This book goes further in depth to how to do the KonMari method, and I’m really looking forward to reading it!

The Dark Days Pact by Alison Goodman

dark days pactHello, Internetland! Today I’m going to be reviewing The Dark Days Pact by Alison Goodman. This is the second book in the series about the Dark Days Club and I highly recommend the first book! Even though there are some people who categorize this book as Steampunk, it’s not. It’s gaslamp fantasy. There’s a very subtle difference between gaslamp fantasy and steampunk and this book definitely falls under the gaslamp fantasy umbrella. For one thing, there are no steampunky gadgets featured in this book. Can’t have a steampunk book without steampunk gadgets!

As I mentioned this is the second book in the series. The first book gives the reader a good base knowledge for the world the book is set in. I’m afraid that if you wanted to jump right into the second book it may take you a while to figure out what’s going on. Fortunately, however, there are some new faces being inducted into the Dark Days Club in this book so we do get a little bit of a recap on what’s happening. Here’s a very undetailed description of the first book: Lady Helen discovers the existence of the Dark Days Club, a secret government organization dedicated to fighting Deceivers (demons who lives as humans and feed off human energy) and that she’s a Reclaimer, basically a warrior who is physically able to fight Deceivers. I really enjoyed the first book in the series and so was quite excited for the second book! While I liked the first book better I really enjoys the second one as well, and I had a really hard time putting it down once I started reading it.

So here’s the basic plot of The Dark Days Pact. Spoiler alert! After the events of the first book Lady Helen has moved to Brighton with Lady Margaret to start her Reclaimer training with Lord Carlston. There she is visited by the Second Secretary to the Home Office, Ignatius Pike. He comes to deliver a message to Lord Carlston, but his true purpose is to swear Lady Helen into the Dark Days Club, officially, and also order her and Lady Margaret’s brother, Mr. Hammond, to secretly retrieve a journal owned by the Terrene of a mad Reclaimer who was the antagonist in the previous book. As Mr. Hammond and Lady Helen begin their secret mission they start to notice that Lord Carlston is slipping further and further into madness, a symptom of Reclaiming for too long. Lord Carlston is convinced it’s not Reclaimer Madness that ails him and starts trying to figure out ways to cure himself. He eventually asks the Comte d’Antraigues, a very old Deceiver who has worked with Lord Carlston before, for help. The Comte says he knows a cure for Lord Carlston, but as payment wants the same journal that Lady Helen and Mr. Hammond are secretly trying to retrieve, as the journal  is rumoured to contain sensitive information about the Comte and his family. Also trying to get the journal is a Deceiver named Philip who works for the Grand Deceiver. So now it’s a race to see who can get the journal first! Also it turns out the journal is actually a Ligatus, an item that could be used to destroy all Reclaimers and open a gate to the Deceiver world (aka Hell). So it’s more important that Lady Helen gets the journal before it falls into the wrong hands.

Here are some of the things I liked about the book. I love the gaslamp fantasy genre almost as much as I love the Steampunk genre. The setting of the book is 1812. I studied historical costume design in university so I’m really familiar with what the fashions of the time were. This made it easy for me to picture the story in my head as I read. I also really enjoyed the secret society fighting evil theme and the characters. I felt the characters were written really well, and even if there’s nothing about the character you can relate to on a personal level you can empathize with them because they are written in such a way that you almost experience their emotions along with them. The romantic tension between Lady Helen and Lord Carlston is a prime example. Dang… The last thing I like about this book is the race against time theme. It makes the book so exciting! Honestly, I had a really hard time putting it down. Work? Who needs to work? Food? Eh, I’ll eat later. It was that compelling.

Despite loving this book so much there are still a couple things that I disliked about it. The first is that while I like the plot, and the secret society theme… it’s really overdone. There are tonnes of books about secret societies that fight evil in order to protect humanity. The Infernal Devices/Mortal Instruments series by Cassandra Clare, for example. Despite it being a really overdone theme in young adult literature right now… I still like it. So sue me. The second thing I disliked about this book was one point of inconsistency that was never explained. At the end of the book SPOILER ALERT when Lord Carlston brings the journal to the Comte and it’s revealed to be a Ligatus the Comte says he wants nothing to do with it. But just a few pages later the Comte tells Lady Helen that the Ligatus is the key to curing Lord Carlston because it will allow them to be joined as the Grand Reclaimer. If the Comte only just found out the journal was a Ligatus how could he possibly have known that it was the key to curing Lord Carlston of his madness?

There you have it, Internetland. My review of The Dark Days Pact by Alison Goodman. I gave this book four out of five stars on Goodreads because while I really enjoyed it, that one giant plot hole at the end was enough to make me dock a star. I hope you’ll give this series a try! If you like books set in Victorian England with a fantasy/supernatural theme you will enjoy this book!

Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson

rollergirlOkay, Internetland, I’m going to share a little known fact about myself here. I play roller derby. Well, sort of. I’m still just a Freshmeat (roller derby slang for new player), but I do play! My derby name is Dewey Decimator and my number is 025. If you’re a librarian, you’ll get the jokes. The reason I’m telling you this is because I’m reviewing Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson today and in my opinion as a player of the sport I can tell you that this book is a pretty accurate representation of roller derby! Not like some other forms of pop culture out there *cough*Whip It Movie*cough*…

Roller Girl is a graphic novel about a 12-year-old girl named Astrid discovering roller derby. The story starts out with her mom taking Astrid and her best friend, Nicole,  to a roller derby bout. At the bout they find out about derby skate camp and Astrid is very excited and can’t wait for her and her Nicole to go together. Unfortunately, Nicole doesn’t want to go to derby camp, and goes to ballet camp instead. The story follows Astrid as she stresses over not being good at derby, starts drifting away from her best friend, starts making new friends, and in general just discovers who she wants to be.

There are a lot of important themes in this book that young adults will find relevant. Friendship is a big one. Astrid and Nicole are drifting apart and Astrid is making new friends, but she’s having a lot of anxiety about it as well. Coming-of-age and self discovery is another important theme. Astrid is trying to discover who she wants to be as she prepares to start junior high. Bullying is another theme that plays a lot into the story. Astrid has been bullied basically her whole life, and continues to be bullied by “the popular girl”. I feel that roller derby is a sport where like-minded people can gather and feel accepted for who they are and that’s why Astrid seems to find herself on the track.

This book does a really good job explaining the sport, but sometimes I felt it was a little too much. I’m sure it’s just because I already know about the sport that I think this, and I know for someone who isn’t familiar with the sport that they would find the explanations very useful. This book also accurately describes how difficult roller derby can be. I don’t think my legs stopped hurting for a whole month after I started roller derby. It’s a very physically demanding sport. Great exercise though! If you’re interested in roller derby I encourage you to do an internet search for your local team! Most teams are online somewhere these days. Also visit the Woman’s Flat Track Roller Derby Association website (https://wftda.com/) for more information on the sport and a list of leagues! Or if you’re in Canada, go here: http://www.crdinfo.ca/

Just for fun, here’s my derby headshot:

025-dewey-decimator

The Burning Page: An Invisible Library Novel by Genevieve Cogman

burning-pageIf you’re a huge book nerd like me, or if you just like librarians the I can guarantee you will love the Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman. There are lots of things to love about this book and it’s preceding books. That being said, this is the third book in the series, and I feel that in order to really understand what’s happening in this book you need to read the first two. The characters are constantly making reference to events that happened previously, so it would be better to read the other two books so you can feel more connected to the characters and the plot.

I don’t want to give too much away about the plot, but here’s the basic premise: There is an interdimensional Library that links to every alternate Earth in existence. These worlds fall onto a spectrum of chaos and order. Most worlds fall around the middle but there are some worlds that are high-chaos where the Fae thrive, and worlds that are high order, where the Dragons thrive.  Humans can exist in both chaos and order. Librarians are humans who live in the Library. They are sent out to each alternate world to collect rare and unique books to bring back for safe keeping in the Library. The main character, Irene, is a Librarian stationed on an alternate world similar to Sherlock Holmes’ London, with some interesting twists… vampires, werewolves, and dragons, oh my!

In this book, Irene and her assistant, Kai, are being sent out to various different alternate worlds on “crap” missions because they are being punished for some events that happened in the last book. Seriously, you should read it. If you love fantasy and science fiction this is the series for you! One minute they are in futuristic worlds, the next more fantasy based ones! Brilliant!

Alright, things I liked about this book are:

  • Set in Victorian England in an alternate version of earth
  • It has a steampunk-y vibe to it
  • There is a Sherlock Holmes type character. I love Sherlock Holmes stories!
  • There are dragons
  • There are librarians
  • The librarians are awesome secret agent for an awesome interdimensional Library.
  • The whole concept of chaos and order is really well thought out
  • Main character is someone I can relate to 

There aren’t too many things I didn’t like about this book, but one of the main things is that there is suddenly a love triangle that I didn’t realize was there, or at least I don’t remember it being mentioned at all in the previous books. It seemed to pop out of nowhere. I knew there was some romantic tension between Irene and another character, but now this third character was thrown in. Seems like there was no build up to it at all.

The other thing I didn’t like about this book was that it ended. I just wanted to keep reading, and reading, and reading! The plot wraps up nicely, but there are so many more questions that are brought up throughout the book and I’m so curious about characters and their background stories now! Guess I’ll have to wait until December for answers. Heavy sigh.

I gave this book 5 out of 5 stars on Goodreads because it was awesome and I highly recommend this series to anyone who loves fantasy novels. The first book is called The Invisible Library, and the second book is called The Masked City. the fourth book is called The Lost Plot and is due to be published at the end of 2017.

Pantomime by Laura Lam

pantomimeOriginally, I picked up this book because it had an interesting cover. I don’t usually judge a book by its cover but in this case the cover just looked so intriguing that I had to pick it up! When I read the back of the book I was further intrigued! I really enjoy gaslamp fantasy novels, The Night Circus  by Erin Morgenstern being my favourite from this genre (it’s so good everyone should go read it right now!). Even though Pantomime falls nicely into the gaslamp fantasy genre it remains unique. Never have I ever read a book with such complicated themes set in a world like this. This book takes fantasy, circus, magic, and rolls in themes like self acceptance, coming of age, LGBTQ+, and intersexuality.

This story is about one person. Gene is a noble girl with a secret. She is both male and female – intersexual. If her secret were to leak out it would be a scandal and she and her whole family would be shunned from society. Then she displays strange magical abilities – last seen in mysterious beings from an almost-forgotten age – The Vestige. Gene discovers her parents are not her real parents and plan to have an unwanted medical procedure performed on her, so she decides she needs to run away from home. So, Gene takes on a new name and becomes Micah Grey, a boy who joins the circus and becomes an aerialist. Micah trains hard and falls in love, but the dark side of the circus forces him to run for his life again.

Honestly, while I really enjoyed this book I felt the story was a bit slow and a little confusing at times. The story hops between Gene’s life as a noble, and Micah’s life in the circus. As the time lines get closer and closer to merging (ie, when Gene becomes Micah) it can get a little confusing as to when things are happening. Despite the slow pace I felt it really picked up near the end as Micah’s secret is exposed and he needs to flee for his life. However, beware! The cliffhanger at the end is real. My library system doesn’t have the second book yet (Shadowplay – 9781509807802, published Jan. 2017) so I have to either buy the sequel myself or wait patiently… heavy sigh.

Another thing I felt was a bit confusing was the Vestige, the ancient civilization that disappeared, leaving only magical artifacts behind.. I felt there wasn’t enough backstory about this and would have appreciated a prologue or foreword describing it in further detail. Perhaps in the next two books more about the Vestige will be revealed as more magic like Micah’s is awakened..

I felt that Laura Lam did a really good job at portraying Gene’s confusion about whether she is male or female. Gene doesn’t quite feel like a female, but not quite a male either. Which is why she is so easily able to slip into Micah’s world. Gene/Micah is a Kedi. An intersexual creature from legend that is the only creature in the world who is whole.

I also liked how Lam described Micah’s confusion about his feelings for both Aenea, his female aerialist partner, and Drystan, the white clown. Micah kept asking himself “Do I like Aenea as a boy or as a girl?” Eventually he decided it didn’t matter and just lets his emotions take over. Despite being in love with Aenea, Micah is still too afraid to tell her about his secret – that he is a Kedi – for fear she will be disgusted with  him and reject him, like someone from Gene’s past did recently. At the end of the book Micah’s secret is revealed! But you’ll have to read the book to find out how both Aenea and Drystan react. #troll

I gave Pantomime 5 out of 5 stars on Goodreads because of the unique and interesting premise and characters. Would have taken half a star from the overall score if i could have due to the slow pace and sometimes confusing order of events.

Writing this review has been difficult because I’m not sure which pronoun to use for Gene/Micah. Gene is the female, but Micah is the male. I’m not sure which gender neutral pronouns to use. Further research is required.

 

Goldenhand by Garth Nix

goldenhandLet me just start by saying that the Abhorsen series by Garth Nix has been one of my favourite book series since I started reading it as a teenager. I’ve re-read the books multiple times since they were released and I never get tired of reading them. I’ve also force fed them to a couple of people who also ended up loving them as much as I do! My love for these books is strange, actually, and people are always surprised I love them given my total aversion to zombies in all forms of pop culture. I don’t know what it is about these books. I love them. I love the characters. I love the world. And i love the lore surrounding the story.

Reading the fifth book in the series made me want to start from the beginning again and read all the books over again for the zillionth time.

This book takes place a few months after the third book in the series, Abhorsen, where Lirael, Sabriel, Touchstone, Sam, and everyone battled against Orannis to save not only the Old Kingdom, but Ancelstierre as well. Lirael is struggling to recover not only from losing her hand during the battle but also losing her best friend the Disreputable Dog. she also struggling to fit into her new life as the Abhorsen-in-Waiting and rushes off to various dangerous tasks in an attempt to not feel. One such dangerous task is to go across the wall and deal with a free magic creature causing trouble. She comes across Nicholas Sayre while she’s there and decides he needs to see the Clayr due to his condition (being half Charter Magic and half Free Magic creature as a result of being possessed by Orannis).

While this is all happening we are introduced to a new character, Ferin. Ferin is a runaway offering to the Witch With No Face (aka, Chlorr of the Mask) and she makes her way to the Clayr’s Glacier to give Lirael a message from her late mother. The message reveals that there is another dangerous threat to the Old Kingdom, and Lirael and Nicholas need to be the one to stop it.

This book nicely wrapped up the Chlorr of the Mask plot that started in the first book (I think… been so long since I read them that I’m not sure when Chlorr was introduced), that was left unfinished in the third book. The fourth book in the series, Clariel, was a prequel that gave us some of Chlorr’s history, but honestly, I wasn’t as big a fan of this one as I was of the other books so I don’t remember much. Need to re-read!

I also really liked that the Old Kingdom was expanded upon in this book! We learn so much more about the northern part of the Old Kingdom and the people who live there. Ferin’s people live in the mountain clans of the north and we learn a lot about her culture and the history of the Witch With No Face. Learning more about the Old Kingdom made me curious about the rest of the world the story takes place in. Are there other countries? Other continents? Are they magical like the Old Kingdom, or are they void of magic like Ancelstierre? I want to know more!

A few things I found annoying about the book was that it referenced events that happen in the short stories Nix wrote about the Old Kingdom (Nicholas Sayre and the Creature in the Case, and To Hold the Bridge). Neither of which I have read.

I also wasn’t a huge fan of the relationship between Nicholas and Lirael. It felt too sudden to be natural. Sure, sometimes people fall in love suddenly like that, but considering the only contact Lirael and Nicholas had was during the battle with Orannis I find it hard to believe they fell in love enough to think about each other so much before reuniting. Perhaps they met up in the short stories, and that furthered their relationship, but I’m not too sure.

The last thing I felt was strange about the book was that the Disreputable Dog could have come back at any time, yet she chose not to despite Lirael’s obvious pain at losing her friend. I know the Dog wanted Lirael to learn to live with humans and create bonds with them, but an occasional visit now and then couldn’t have hurt, right?

Well, there you go. That’s my review of Goldenhand by Garth Nix. I gave this book 5 out of 5 stars on Goodreads because despite the few things I disliked about this book I absolutely loved and and want more Old Kingdom books! Mr. Nix, if you read this, please don’t ever abandon the Old Kingdom and the people in it! I love them all so much!