The Dark Days Pact by Alison Goodman

dark days pactHello, Internetland! Today I’m going to be reviewing The Dark Days Pact by Alison Goodman. This is the second book in the series about the Dark Days Club and I highly recommend the first book! Even though there are some people who categorize this book as Steampunk, it’s not. It’s gaslamp fantasy. There’s a very subtle difference between gaslamp fantasy and steampunk and this book definitely falls under the gaslamp fantasy umbrella. For one thing, there are no steampunky gadgets featured in this book. Can’t have a steampunk book without steampunk gadgets!

As I mentioned this is the second book in the series. The first book gives the reader a good base knowledge for the world the book is set in. I’m afraid that if you wanted to jump right into the second book it may take you a while to figure out what’s going on. Fortunately, however, there are some new faces being inducted into the Dark Days Club in this book so we do get a little bit of a recap on what’s happening. Here’s a very undetailed description of the first book: Lady Helen discovers the existence of the Dark Days Club, a secret government organization dedicated to fighting Deceivers (demons who lives as humans and feed off human energy) and that she’s a Reclaimer, basically a warrior who is physically able to fight Deceivers. I really enjoyed the first book in the series and so was quite excited for the second book! While I liked the first book better I really enjoys the second one as well, and I had a really hard time putting it down once I started reading it.

So here’s the basic plot of The Dark Days Pact. Spoiler alert! After the events of the first book Lady Helen has moved to Brighton with Lady Margaret to start her Reclaimer training with Lord Carlston. There she is visited by the Second Secretary to the Home Office, Ignatius Pike. He comes to deliver a message to Lord Carlston, but his true purpose is to swear Lady Helen into the Dark Days Club, officially, and also order her and Lady Margaret’s brother, Mr. Hammond, to secretly retrieve a journal owned by the Terrene of a mad Reclaimer who was the antagonist in the previous book. As Mr. Hammond and Lady Helen begin their secret mission they start to notice that Lord Carlston is slipping further and further into madness, a symptom of Reclaiming for too long. Lord Carlston is convinced it’s not Reclaimer Madness that ails him and starts trying to figure out ways to cure himself. He eventually asks the Comte d’Antraigues, a very old Deceiver who has worked with Lord Carlston before, for help. The Comte says he knows a cure for Lord Carlston, but as payment wants the same journal that Lady Helen and Mr. Hammond are secretly trying to retrieve, as the journal  is rumoured to contain sensitive information about the Comte and his family. Also trying to get the journal is a Deceiver named Philip who works for the Grand Deceiver. So now it’s a race to see who can get the journal first! Also it turns out the journal is actually a Ligatus, an item that could be used to destroy all Reclaimers and open a gate to the Deceiver world (aka Hell). So it’s more important that Lady Helen gets the journal before it falls into the wrong hands.

Here are some of the things I liked about the book. I love the gaslamp fantasy genre almost as much as I love the Steampunk genre. The setting of the book is 1812. I studied historical costume design in university so I’m really familiar with what the fashions of the time were. This made it easy for me to picture the story in my head as I read. I also really enjoyed the secret society fighting evil theme and the characters. I felt the characters were written really well, and even if there’s nothing about the character you can relate to on a personal level you can empathize with them because they are written in such a way that you almost experience their emotions along with them. The romantic tension between Lady Helen and Lord Carlston is a prime example. Dang… The last thing I like about this book is the race against time theme. It makes the book so exciting! Honestly, I had a really hard time putting it down. Work? Who needs to work? Food? Eh, I’ll eat later. It was that compelling.

Despite loving this book so much there are still a couple things that I disliked about it. The first is that while I like the plot, and the secret society theme… it’s really overdone. There are tonnes of books about secret societies that fight evil in order to protect humanity. The Infernal Devices/Mortal Instruments series by Cassandra Clare, for example. Despite it being a really overdone theme in young adult literature right now… I still like it. So sue me. The second thing I disliked about this book was one point of inconsistency that was never explained. At the end of the book SPOILER ALERT when Lord Carlston brings the journal to the Comte and it’s revealed to be a Ligatus the Comte says he wants nothing to do with it. But just a few pages later the Comte tells Lady Helen that the Ligatus is the key to curing Lord Carlston because it will allow them to be joined as the Grand Reclaimer. If the Comte only just found out the journal was a Ligatus how could he possibly have known that it was the key to curing Lord Carlston of his madness?

There you have it, Internetland. My review of The Dark Days Pact by Alison Goodman. I gave this book four out of five stars on Goodreads because while I really enjoyed it, that one giant plot hole at the end was enough to make me dock a star. I hope you’ll give this series a try! If you like books set in Victorian England with a fantasy/supernatural theme you will enjoy this book!

The Burning Page: An Invisible Library Novel by Genevieve Cogman

burning-pageIf you’re a huge book nerd like me, or if you just like librarians the I can guarantee you will love the Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman. There are lots of things to love about this book and it’s preceding books. That being said, this is the third book in the series, and I feel that in order to really understand what’s happening in this book you need to read the first two. The characters are constantly making reference to events that happened previously, so it would be better to read the other two books so you can feel more connected to the characters and the plot.

I don’t want to give too much away about the plot, but here’s the basic premise: There is an interdimensional Library that links to every alternate Earth in existence. These worlds fall onto a spectrum of chaos and order. Most worlds fall around the middle but there are some worlds that are high-chaos where the Fae thrive, and worlds that are high order, where the Dragons thrive.  Humans can exist in both chaos and order. Librarians are humans who live in the Library. They are sent out to each alternate world to collect rare and unique books to bring back for safe keeping in the Library. The main character, Irene, is a Librarian stationed on an alternate world similar to Sherlock Holmes’ London, with some interesting twists… vampires, werewolves, and dragons, oh my!

In this book, Irene and her assistant, Kai, are being sent out to various different alternate worlds on “crap” missions because they are being punished for some events that happened in the last book. Seriously, you should read it. If you love fantasy and science fiction this is the series for you! One minute they are in futuristic worlds, the next more fantasy based ones! Brilliant!

Alright, things I liked about this book are:

  • Set in Victorian England in an alternate version of earth
  • It has a steampunk-y vibe to it
  • There is a Sherlock Holmes type character. I love Sherlock Holmes stories!
  • There are dragons
  • There are librarians
  • The librarians are awesome secret agent for an awesome interdimensional Library.
  • The whole concept of chaos and order is really well thought out
  • Main character is someone I can relate to 

There aren’t too many things I didn’t like about this book, but one of the main things is that there is suddenly a love triangle that I didn’t realize was there, or at least I don’t remember it being mentioned at all in the previous books. It seemed to pop out of nowhere. I knew there was some romantic tension between Irene and another character, but now this third character was thrown in. Seems like there was no build up to it at all.

The other thing I didn’t like about this book was that it ended. I just wanted to keep reading, and reading, and reading! The plot wraps up nicely, but there are so many more questions that are brought up throughout the book and I’m so curious about characters and their background stories now! Guess I’ll have to wait until December for answers. Heavy sigh.

I gave this book 5 out of 5 stars on Goodreads because it was awesome and I highly recommend this series to anyone who loves fantasy novels. The first book is called The Invisible Library, and the second book is called The Masked City. the fourth book is called The Lost Plot and is due to be published at the end of 2017.

Pantomime by Laura Lam

pantomimeOriginally, I picked up this book because it had an interesting cover. I don’t usually judge a book by its cover but in this case the cover just looked so intriguing that I had to pick it up! When I read the back of the book I was further intrigued! I really enjoy gaslamp fantasy novels, The Night Circus  by Erin Morgenstern being my favourite from this genre (it’s so good everyone should go read it right now!). Even though Pantomime falls nicely into the gaslamp fantasy genre it remains unique. Never have I ever read a book with such complicated themes set in a world like this. This book takes fantasy, circus, magic, and rolls in themes like self acceptance, coming of age, LGBTQ+, and intersexuality.

This story is about one person. Gene is a noble girl with a secret. She is both male and female – intersexual. If her secret were to leak out it would be a scandal and she and her whole family would be shunned from society. Then she displays strange magical abilities – last seen in mysterious beings from an almost-forgotten age – The Vestige. Gene discovers her parents are not her real parents and plan to have an unwanted medical procedure performed on her, so she decides she needs to run away from home. So, Gene takes on a new name and becomes Micah Grey, a boy who joins the circus and becomes an aerialist. Micah trains hard and falls in love, but the dark side of the circus forces him to run for his life again.

Honestly, while I really enjoyed this book I felt the story was a bit slow and a little confusing at times. The story hops between Gene’s life as a noble, and Micah’s life in the circus. As the time lines get closer and closer to merging (ie, when Gene becomes Micah) it can get a little confusing as to when things are happening. Despite the slow pace I felt it really picked up near the end as Micah’s secret is exposed and he needs to flee for his life. However, beware! The cliffhanger at the end is real. My library system doesn’t have the second book yet (Shadowplay – 9781509807802, published Jan. 2017) so I have to either buy the sequel myself or wait patiently… heavy sigh.

Another thing I felt was a bit confusing was the Vestige, the ancient civilization that disappeared, leaving only magical artifacts behind.. I felt there wasn’t enough backstory about this and would have appreciated a prologue or foreword describing it in further detail. Perhaps in the next two books more about the Vestige will be revealed as more magic like Micah’s is awakened..

I felt that Laura Lam did a really good job at portraying Gene’s confusion about whether she is male or female. Gene doesn’t quite feel like a female, but not quite a male either. Which is why she is so easily able to slip into Micah’s world. Gene/Micah is a Kedi. An intersexual creature from legend that is the only creature in the world who is whole.

I also liked how Lam described Micah’s confusion about his feelings for both Aenea, his female aerialist partner, and Drystan, the white clown. Micah kept asking himself “Do I like Aenea as a boy or as a girl?” Eventually he decided it didn’t matter and just lets his emotions take over. Despite being in love with Aenea, Micah is still too afraid to tell her about his secret – that he is a Kedi – for fear she will be disgusted with  him and reject him, like someone from Gene’s past did recently. At the end of the book Micah’s secret is revealed! But you’ll have to read the book to find out how both Aenea and Drystan react. #troll

I gave Pantomime 5 out of 5 stars on Goodreads because of the unique and interesting premise and characters. Would have taken half a star from the overall score if i could have due to the slow pace and sometimes confusing order of events.

Writing this review has been difficult because I’m not sure which pronoun to use for Gene/Micah. Gene is the female, but Micah is the male. I’m not sure which gender neutral pronouns to use. Further research is required.